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Detailed Analysis of Wisconsin Pedestrian and Bicycle Police Crash Report Narratives

Abstract: This presentation will summarize an in-depth study of pedestrian and bicycle crashes reported to police in Wisconsin between 2011 and 2013. First, we analyzed the spatial concentrations of severe and fatal injury crashes, producing descriptions of the top 20 pedestrian crash and top 20 bicycle crash “hot spots” in Wisconsin. Many of these hot spots were along signalized multilane thoroughfares with speed limits of 30 mph and higher in urban and suburban communities.

Second, we reviewed police-written narratives from a sample of 296 pedestrian and 229 bicycle crashes reported in Wisconsin between 2011 and 2013 to explore behaviors, roadway design characteristics, and other site features associated with the most serious pedestrian and bicyclist crashes. During this process, we developed a new method of classifying pedestrian and bicycle crashes called the location-movement classification method (LMCM). The presentation will show how the LMCM provides useful information that is not captured by a well-established National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) crash typology.

The LMCM revealed that pedestrian crashes of all injury severity levels were significantly more likely to be on the far side than on the near side of intersections. Pedestrian crashes were significantly more likely to be fatal than non-severe when they involved motorists traveling straight, were along roadways between intersections, and involved pedestrians approaching from the motorist’s left. Bicycle crashes were significantly more likely to be fatal than non-severe when they involved motorists traveling straight, were along roadways between intersections, and involved motorists traveling in the same direction as the bicyclist. The presentation will conclude by highlighting engineering, education, and enforcement treatments that can potentially reduce common types of pedestrian and bicycle crashes.


Dr. Robert Schneider -  Associate Professor in the UW-Milwaukee Department of Urban Planning, has more than 15 years of experience in the pedestrian and bicycle transportation field. His research focuses on three interrelated areas of multimodal planning: travel behavior, safety analysis, and performance measurement. Dr. Schneider’s safety research has developed a new method to classify pedestrian and bicyclist crashes, identified roadway design and pedestrian behavior characteristics associated with driver yielding at crosswalks, and modeled the relationship between intersection design characteristics (e.g., median islands, designated right-turn lanes) and pedestrian crashes after controlling for pedestrian and motor vehicle volumes. Dr. Schneider is the current chair the Transportation Research Board Pedestrian Committee, providing national and international leadership that bridges the academic and professional community.

 

 

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